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During photosynthesis, plants absorb carbon dioxide from the air and transform it into sugars, carbohydrates, and other carbon-based molecules.Some of those carbon products transfer from the roots to symbiotic fungi and soil microbes, which store the carbon in soil as humus.Chert, jasper and quartzite were often used by humans during this period. With the right stewardship, Lal says, the agricultural soils of the world have the potential to soak up 13 percent of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere today - the equivalent of scrubbing every ounce of CO2 released into the atmosphere since 1980.[....] For millions of years, a natural partnership between plants and soil microbes has helped regulate carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.Radiocarbon dates place the beginning of the occupation at ca. At the time, the site, now only five miles from the Gulf Coast near Tallahassee, was nearly 100 miles inland, and Florida's landscape resembled Africa's savannahs.Within 100 years, however, rising water at the end of the last glaciation flooded the site, sealing it with deposits that contain shells of freshwater molluscs."8,000 B. - Ancient Ruins / India - "At Poompuhur, facing the Bay of Bengal, Indian divers found a horseshoe-shaped object, measuring 85 metres in length, in water more than 23 metres deep.

In places wehere the ground is bare - from overgrazing or from the common practice of leaving fields unplanted for part of the year - photosynthesis stops. Lal calculates that land use changes such as these have stripped 70 billion to 100 billion tons of carbon from the world's soils and pumped it into the earth's atmosphere, oceans, and lakes since the dawn of agriculture. - Geography Trivia / Ireland - "The shape and landscape of present-day Ireland—an island of 27,100 square miles [70,200 square kilometers]—were formed 10,000 years ago when Atlantic Ocean glaciers slowly began their retreat.- Wiki Trivia - "The 9th millennium BC marks the beginning of the Neolithic period. [NP] Pottery became widespread (with independent development in Central America) and animal husbandry (pastoralism) spread to Africa and Eurasia. [....]"[....] Professor Dinesh Agrawal of Penn State University reviewed the evidence from a variety of sources and estimated the dates as follows: 1. These are the "bog bodies." The individual bog bodies show a great degree of variation in their state of preservation, from skeletons, to well-preserved complete bodies, to isolated heads and limbs.[NP] Agriculture spread throughout the Fertile Crescent and use of pottery became more widespread. - Amesbury in Wiltshire confirmed as oldest UK settlement - "A Wiltshire town has been confirmed as the longest continuous settlement in the United Kingdom. P.] Amesbury, including Stonehenge, has been continually occupied since 8820BC, experts have found. They range in date from 8,000 "Stonehenge was for a long while thought to have been built slowly - over about 1000 years between 2,100 and 1,100 BC.From around 550 BCE, many independent kingdoms and republics known as the Mahajanapadas were established across the country.[23] [....]" [Based on: - [T. - 12/15/08]*Trivia: "[....] At the Rock Shelters of Bhimbetka humans lived throughout the Upper Paleolithic (10th to 8th millennia BC), revealing cave paintings dating to ca. The ensuing increase in food resources made possible a spectacular growth of human population between 80 B. It also required cooperative effort, particularly after the introduction of irrigation led to the establishment of settled organized societies, at first in villages and later in towns and cities, and the development of new technologies, social systems and ideologies." [Based on: Compact History Of The World, edited by Geoffrey Parker, copyright 2003, pp.7000 BC; the Sivaliks and the Potwar (Pakistan) region also exhibit many vertebrate fossil remains and paleolithic tools. 16-17] - [First published by Times Books (as The Times Compact Atlas of World History) 1995 - updated and reprinted 2002] *Trivia: "If Ohio State University soil scientist Rattan Lal is right, one of the simplest solutions to climate change may be right under our feet.

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